updated 6:12 AM CDT, Aug 9, 2017
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TermDefinitionTags
At Risk OccupationsOccupations where projections indicate the demand for the occupations will decline at a rate greater than normal attrition are potentially “at risk”.  These occupations will be reflected as surpluses when data from the demand and supply models are compared....
Atypical workerSomeone who does not operate in a full-time or permanent employment capacity, ie: a part-time, fixed-term or temporary employee, persons employed through labour brokers. Typically refers to persons employed in non traditional forms of employment. The employment of atypical employees are increasingly subject to regulatory protection or regulation especially for those atypical employees earning below the "earnings threshold"....
Essential functionsmeans those job duties that are so fundamental to the position that the individual holds or desires that she or he cannot do the job without performing them. A function can be essential” if, among other things, the position exists specifically to perform that function; there are a limited number of other employees who could perform the function; or the function is so specialized that the individual is hired based on his/her ability to perform it. Determination of the essential functions of a position must be done on a case-by-case basis so that it reflects the job as actually performed, and not simply the components of a generic position description....
GenderGender is a  culturally-specific set characteristics that identifies the social behavior fo women and men and the relationship between them. Gender refers to social differences, as opposed to biological ones (sex), between women and men that have been learned, are changeable over time, and vary widely both within and between cultures....
Gender analysisGender analysis is the systematic examination of the roles, relationships, and processes between women and men in all societies, focusing on imbalances in power, wealth, and workload.  Gender analysis can also include the examination of the multiple ways in which women and men, as social actors, engage in strategies to transform existing roles, relationships, and processes in their own interest and in the interest of others....
Gender And Development (GAD)Refers to a planning process which is based on an analysis of the different situations and needs of women and men. In empowering women to their position relative to men in a way that will benefit and transform society, the GAD approach seeks to base interventions on an analysis of women's and men's roles and needs - including a focus on women to address inequity....
Gender AwarenessRefers to a state of knowledge of the differences in roles and relations of women and men, and how this results in differences in power relations, status, privileges and needs. ...
Gender contractA gender contract is a set of implicit and explicit rules governing gender relations which allocate different work and value, rights, responsibilities and obligations to women and men.  The gender contract is subject to change, often through (re) negotiation of needs and interests, and redefinition of roles, rights and responsibilities between women and men, husbands and wives etc..  Renegotiation of the gender contract may involve conflict and contestation between women and men....
Gender EqualityGender equality or equality between women and men means the equal employment by men and women of socially valued goods, opportunities, resources and rewards. Because what is valued differs among societies, a crucial aspect of equality is the empowerment of women to influence what is valued and share in decision making about societal priorities. Gender equality entails that the underlying causes of discrimination are systematically identified and removed in order to give men and women equal opportunities. The concept of gender equality as used in this document takes into account women's subordinate position within social relations and aims at the restructuring of society so as to eradicate male domination. Therefore, equality is understood to include both formal equality and substantive equality, not merely simple equality to men. ...
Gender EquityRefers to the fair and just distribution of all means of opportunities and resources between men and women....
Gender IssuesAre revealed when the relationships between men and women, their roles, privileges, status and positions, are identified and analysed. Gender issues arise where inequalities and inequities are shown to exist between people purely on the basis of their being female or male. The fact that gender and gender differences are socially constructed is itself a primary issue to deal with. ...
Gender mainstreamingGender mainstreaming is the systematic integration of the respective situations, priorities, and needs of women and men in all policies, programs, and projects and with a view to promoting equality between women and men and mobilizing all general policies and measures specifically for the purpose of achieving equality by actively and openly taking into account, at the planning stage, their effects on the respective situations of women and men in implementation, monitoring and evaluation....
Gender PerspectiveRefers to an approach in which the ultimate goal is to create equity and equality between women and men. Such an approach has a set of tools for and guidelines on how to identify the impact of the relations and roles of women and men on development. ...
Gender relationsGender relations refer to the relationship and unequal distribution of power between women and men which characterize any specific gender system....
Gender ResponsiveRefers to a planning process in which programmes and policy actions are developed to deal with and counteract problems which arise if the needs arising out are socially constructed differences between women and men are not adequately met. ...
Gender rolesGender roles are due to social factors that influence or allocate activities, responsibilities, and decision-making authority to groups of people. Gender roles change, often spontaneously and sometimes quickly, as the underlying social, economic and technological conditions change.  Social factors which underlie and sometimes reinforce gender differences include religious practices, ethnic or cultural attitudes, class or caste, the formal legal system, and institutional arrangements. ...
Gender SensitiveRefers to the state of knowledge of the socially constructed differences between women and men, including their different needs, and use of such knowledge to identify and understand the problems arising from these differences and to act purposefully to address them. ...
Gender-Sensitive IndicatorsRefers to those pointers that help point out the extent and manner in which development programmes have met their (gender) objectives and achieved results that advance gender equity. ...
Inherent requirements of the jobare those requirements the employer stipulates as necessary for a person to be appointed to the job, and are necessary in order to enable an employee to perform the essential functions of the job....

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